NSW SES Swansea Unit to look after look after about 25,000 people who live between Doyalson North and Belmont South

OCCASION: NSW State Emergency Service Commissioner Kyle Stewart, deputy local commander Sarah Miller, Swansea SES unit commander Nicholas Hanrahan and NSW upper house member Taylor Martin open the Swansea SES unit.
OCCASION: NSW State Emergency Service Commissioner Kyle Stewart, deputy local commander Sarah Miller, Swansea SES unit commander Nicholas Hanrahan and NSW upper house member Taylor Martin open the Swansea SES unit.

LAKE Macquarie has a new State Emergency Service (SES) unit, and the organisation is seeking more volunteers to help the unit better protect the community.

The NSW SES Swansea Unit is tasked with preparing the Lake Macquarie community for floods, storms and tsunamis.

It was officially opened on Saturday.

The unit will look after about 25,000 people who live between Doyalson North and Belmont South.

The unit volunteers have state-of-the-art rescue equipment including an Ark Angel rescue raft, light storm ute, logistics ute and a storm trailer to help them save lives in emergency situations.

Member of the Legislative Council (MLC), Taylor Martin, representing the Minister for Police and Emergency Services, David Elliott officially opened the Swansea Unit with NSW SES Commissioner Kyle Stewart.

"NSW SES volunteers have a long history of assisting their community with invaluable emergency response during floods, storms and other emergencies," Mr Martin said.

"I'm proud to be officially opening the new NSW SES Swansea Unit."

Commissioner Stewart said there was an increasing need for NSW SES volunteers in the lower end of Lake Macquarie.

"The NSW SES Swansea Unit provides Lake Macquarie residents with additional support prior to and during emergencies," he said.

"Our volunteers work with their community to ensure they understand their flood and storm risk."

The NSW SES has 9,500 volunteers who partner with their communities prior to and during emergencies.

Orange tribute

ON May 22, people around the country wore orange to show their gratitude to hardworking SES volunteers.

The volunteers are the lifeblood of communities across NSW who last year responded to more than 35,000 requests for assistance.

There are about 9,500 NSW SES volunteers. They come from all walks of life, with many different skills, interests and backgrounds.

They include Bob Drewar, 78, who heads the Cooranbong SES unit's communications section.

In June, Mr Drewar received a third clasp to the National Medal, for 45 years of service to the SES.

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