Royal Freemasons' Benevolent Institution CEO Frank Price visits Lake Haven Masonic Village on eve of Royal Commission into Aged Care

ROADSHOW: Frank Price, right, with Dobell MP Emma McBride, left, and Peter Mackinnon, Louanne Riboldi and Toni Giles of RFBI Lake Haven Masonic Village, during the CEO's visit last week. Picture: Supplied
ROADSHOW: Frank Price, right, with Dobell MP Emma McBride, left, and Peter Mackinnon, Louanne Riboldi and Toni Giles of RFBI Lake Haven Masonic Village, during the CEO's visit last week. Picture: Supplied

THE head of a major aged care provider group has visited a Central Coast village to show his support to staff and reassure residents, families and home care clients on the eve of the Royal Commission into Aged Care.

Royal Freemasons’ Benevolent Institution (RFBI) chief executive officer, Frank Price, visited RFBI Lake Haven Masonic Village last week.

It was part of what Mr Price described as his ‘RFBI Roadshow’ in which he will visit each of RFBI’s 21 residential care villages across NSW and the ACT.

“The Royal Commission will shine a very bright light on examples where care has not been delivered appropriately and there will no doubt be a lot of media coverage around these incidents,” Mr Price said.

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“I am confident about the quality care we provide across RFBI and I want our staff to know that I am behind them.

“I also want our residents, families and Care at Home clients to know that we expect everyone to receive the very highest quality of care and if they ever feel like they are not getting this, to let us know so that we can address it.”

At each facility he visits, Mr Price has held ‘meet the CEO’ sessions where staff, residents, families and Care at Home clients are encouraged to ask questions or put forward suggestions for how RFBI can improve.

“I feel it is important that our staff, residents, families and Care at Home clients know that their feedback is valued and I am always available if they want to share a good or bad experience with me,” Mr Price said.

Feedback received during the roadshow had so far been “very positive”, he said.

Meanwhile, Leading Age Services Australia (LASA), the national peak body representing aged care, said the federal government needed to make aged care a budget priority if it was “serious about providing affordable, sustainable, quality care and services to older Australians”.

LASA has detailed a list of funding priorities in its budget submission to the government.

The funding priorities include $670 million per year to offset recent reductions in indexation; about $100 million per year in additional targeted relief for facilities in remote and outer regional areas; and about $100 million per year to support older Australians experiencing the symptoms of dementia.

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