Hunter ABA volunteers are hosting workshops and meetings for mothers during World Breastfeeding Week

Bonding: Sarah Wooden, of Dora Creek, said the support she received from the Australian Breastfeeding Association was invaluable. Picture: Mapleberry Photography

Bonding: Sarah Wooden, of Dora Creek, said the support she received from the Australian Breastfeeding Association was invaluable. Picture: Mapleberry Photography

SARAH Wooden’s first encounter with the Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) was after the early arrival of her first child, Lydia, who was born 10 weeks early.

“We were having a lot of problems,” Ms Wooden said.

“I was getting very engorged, very full, and I had so much milk that I actually donated 46 litres in my first 16 weeks of feeding. So my interactions with the ABA were around how to manage such a huge supply of milk.”

Ms Wooden wanted to raise awareness of the work of the association during World Breastfeeding Week.

“Their guidelines around how to store and handle my milk – because obviously I was producing far more than the hospital needed, really helped me, as were their guidelines on feeding premmies. That information was invaluable,” Ms Wooden said.

“They put their heart and soul into it. They are there all the time – 24/7. If it’s 3 o’clock in the morning and you’re having a rough time, there is always some support there.”

This week, local volunteers and members of the ABA have been providing health professional education workshops, hosting mother-to-mother meetings and promoting the Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace Accreditation program.

“This grassroots work is essential to supporting mothers to care for their children and ensuring that families, and health professionals, have access to up-to-date, evidence-based breastfeeding information,” ABA chief, Alison Boughey, said.

Find your local branch via breastfeeding.asn.au/contacts/groups.

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