Georgina Grimshaw’s exploring life through songs

SOFTLY, SOFTLY: Georgina Grimshaw said songwriting was a way "to explore, understand and come to terms with things". She's working on an album she hopes to release this year. Picture: Supplied
SOFTLY, SOFTLY: Georgina Grimshaw said songwriting was a way "to explore, understand and come to terms with things". She's working on an album she hopes to release this year. Picture: Supplied

WHEN Georgina Grimshaw, 23, was a kid she wanted to be an opera singer so she could “sing loud”. 

Somewhere along the way she settled for writing and performing her own tunes. He work fits into the American folk genre, but Grimshaw prefers to think of it as “acoustic, country-folk”. 

“It’s softly spoken, softly sung story telling,” she said. 

Grimshaw sites some of the Australian greats as influences.

“I learnt to sing listening to Missy Higgins and Delta Goodrem,” she said. “I was quite young and I remember listening to them over and over again. Trying to learn and copy them.”

She wrote her first song in year 7 at Charlton Christian College, Fassifern.

“We had this assignment in music class and I wrote this really crappy love song,” she said. “At the time I thought it was the best thing ever. It was about a guy I had a crush on.”

Her writing has matured over time, but she still likes to be “honest” in her songs. 

She launched her five-track debut EP Cafe Corner in 2016. It was recorded by Matt Purcell at The Green Room, Warners Bay. 

“Last Friday, I was gigging and someone, a stranger, came up and requested a song,” she said. “I thought he would ask for Horses, or something. He asked for one of my songs … it meant a lot to me.”

She has also recorded and released two singles. Chance was released in 2015 and Rights in 2016. She will soon release a single Nothing to Hide off an upcoming album. 

For Grimshaw songwriting is a way to understand life.

“When you try to understand emotions, sometimes it can headbutt you,” she said.

“My life, other people’s lives that I care about. It’s a way to explore, understand and come to terms with things.”

A track Free Now will also be on the album she hopes to release by the end of this year.

“I wrote that song for a friend who passed away,” she said. 

“There’s a love song. It’s about when you get over a break up and then start to have feelings for someone else. There’s a break-up song, too.”

She plays regularly at venues on the Central Coast, and across the Hunter.